The Acoustic

Bar & Music Hall

The best sounding, best looking stage in town.

Built for musicians, by musicians.

Cousin Earth, Ampevene, Jennifer Harper

Cousin Earth (formerly Known as Ukulelien) is a Brooklyn-based progressive Ukulele band. With both an original repertoire and a vast array of covers, Cousin Earth spans a wide range of musical styles bringing both a sense of playfulness and technical ability to the music many people know and love. From bluegrass to electronica, this band will take any song and uke-i-fy it.

Ampevene started as a project for guitarist Gabe Stallman to turn all of the noise in his head into something he could show his friends. After ending a tenure with local pop band Sympathy for Achilles, Gabe worked on creating the kind of music he liked to listen to. Blending styles from his favorite bands: Mars Volta, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Pink Floyd, Primus, and Tool, he found the perfect mix of Jam, Funk, and Confusion to keep him happy. He entered the studio with bassist Grant Horner, and drummer John Neville to record, playing both guitar and keys himself. Once the EP ( http://gabestallman.bandcamp.com/ ) was finished it seemed worth taking further, turning what was at first simply a solo project for fun, into a full band commitment. Gabe and John brought in Nick Kozak (of Happy Birthday Dr. Jim) to play bass, and Brandon Salo to play keys live. After a few gigs, Brandon left and was then replaced by Ava Smith, and months later do to a busy work and school schedule, John left to be replaced by Bob Morris. A few months after that, Nick left to be replaced by Mack Hogan. There is hope that the band will at some point be joined by a vocalist, but as of now the music works well instrumentally. 

Jennifer Harper’s rich voice and intimate lyrics evoke a 1970’s love-child spirit, with a fresh layer of pop-rock, reminiscent of Carole King, Carly Simon and Sheryl Crowe. Her latest EP, All The Love, navigates love through its various expressions, whether it be celebratory, hopeful, mysterious or gentle.

Raised in Washington DC in a musical family, Harper studied classical piano from a young age. She taught herself songs she heard by The Beatles, Cat Stevens and Simon & Garfunkel. And as a teenager, she was drawn into the alternative venues and reggae clubs. Political rallies at the time made the deepest impressions on the artist. "I saw how music was being used to change things,” Harper said. And she wanted in. She was inspired by strong female voices of the ‘80s, like Annie Lennox and Chrissie Hynde. The raw intimacy of Tracy Chapman’s voice and lyrics gave her the strength to be an artist true to her own experiences.